jtotheizzoe:

via txchnologist:

Here is another advanced material The Slo Mo Guys caught with their Phantom Flex camera when they were recording some of GE’s research. They got to play with magnetic liquid called ferrofluid, shown in this gif, along with the superhydrophobic coatings that completely repel water. The liquid above is made of tiny particles of magnetic materials suspended in a solution. Such fluids behave in odd and interesting ways when they are exposed to magnetic fields. 
See their whole video here.
Read More

I will never not reblog ferrofuids.
Check out my extensive addiction to liquid magnetism here.

jtotheizzoe:

via txchnologist:

Here is another advanced material The Slo Mo Guys caught with their Phantom Flex camera when they were recording some of GE’s research. They got to play with magnetic liquid called ferrofluid, shown in this gif, along with the superhydrophobic coatings that completely repel water. The liquid above is made of tiny particles of magnetic materials suspended in a solution. Such fluids behave in odd and interesting ways when they are exposed to magnetic fields. 

See their whole video here.

Read More

I will never not reblog ferrofuids.

Check out my extensive addiction to liquid magnetism here.

rorschachx:

A sengi (elephant shrew) investigates a swallowtail butterfly in the new nature series Hidden Kingdoms. The BBC is to air on-screen warnings that scenes were ‘dramatised’. For the sake of the creatures and editorial reasons producers sometimes have to use controlled situations and film animals in captivity or in studios for detailed shots that cannot be done in the wild | image: BBC

rorschachx:

A sengi (elephant shrew) investigates a swallowtail butterfly in the new nature series Hidden Kingdoms. The BBC is to air on-screen warnings that scenes were ‘dramatised’. For the sake of the creatures and editorial reasons producers sometimes have to use controlled situations and film animals in captivity or in studios for detailed shots that cannot be done in the wild | image: BBC

(via science-junkie)

cmog:

Interested in seeing the design drawings for these invertebrates?

The Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka archive in the Rakow Research Library includes over 900 original art drawings of plants and invertebrate animals made as studies for the glass models.

Check out the digital archive >

archiemcphee:

We share all sorts of amazing things that aren’t what they seem at the Geyser of Awesome. Here’s another one, and it’s a doozy:

You may think you’re looking at photos of beautiful undersea invertebrates, but these delicate beauties are actually models made of clear, coloured, and painted glass. Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, a father and son team of master glassmakers (previously featured here), painstakingly created these extraordinary glass models of invertebrate animals (jellyfish, snails, sea anemones, corals, hidroids, starfish, sea-cucumbers, squid, seaslugs and bivalves) from the mid 1800s until the 1930s.

Photographer Guido Mocafico visited the natural history museums which still house collections of the Blaschka’s work, including Harvard University Herbaria, the Corning Museum of Glass/Cornell University, and the Natural History Museums in London and Ireland, in order to create a marvelous series of photographs celebrating these exquisite models. He set the pieces against dark backdrops and carefully lit them to emphasize their different colours and textures.

As you can see here, the results that Guido Mocafico achieved for his travel and effort are completely wonderful. Click here to view more.

[via Faith is Torment]

sethualtension:

angryblackchickk:

this is fucking terrifying

this is awful

what the actual

I don’t think you get it Buzz. I’m Andy’s favorite toy. I will always be his favorite toy. How many more people must I kill until you come to realize this?

(Source: rachniqueen, via ruinedchildhood)

thecourtjack:

grawly:

For a second I seriously thought there was a child inside that box.

Shh, Elmo will make the pain go away soon.

thecourtjack:

grawly:

For a second I seriously thought there was a child inside that box.

Shh, Elmo will make the pain go away soon.

(via ruinedchildhood)

jtotheizzoe:

This Is Where You Feel Your Feels
Are our emotions universal, across borders of culture and language? Is my happy the same as your happy? Do I experience anger in precisely the same way that you do?
Psychologically speaking, that’s a difficult question to answer. But according to a new study on the physiological experience of emotions, our bodies respond in very particular ways to a range of feelings.
Hundreds of people were presented with various images designed to cause an emotional response. The participants then indicated where on their bodies they felt increased (orange and yellow, above) or decreased (blue, above) sensation, essentially drawing a kind of atlas of emotional response.
The results are pretty interesting, and nice to look at as well. I have to wonder why contempt causes that very specific lack of sensation south of the border, though.
More at Discover Magazine.

jtotheizzoe:

This Is Where You Feel Your Feels

Are our emotions universal, across borders of culture and language? Is my happy the same as your happy? Do I experience anger in precisely the same way that you do?

Psychologically speaking, that’s a difficult question to answer. But according to a new study on the physiological experience of emotions, our bodies respond in very particular ways to a range of feelings.

Hundreds of people were presented with various images designed to cause an emotional response. The participants then indicated where on their bodies they felt increased (orange and yellow, above) or decreased (blue, above) sensation, essentially drawing a kind of atlas of emotional response.

The results are pretty interesting, and nice to look at as well. I have to wonder why contempt causes that very specific lack of sensation south of the border, though.

More at Discover Magazine.

zooborns:

Hutia Babies Hitch a Ride

Riding on the back of their mother, three Cuban Hutia babies born November 7 are charming visitors at Munich’s Tierpark Hellabrunn

Learn more about this species at Zooborns.

zooborns:

It’s a Girl! Whipsnade Zoo Welcomes a Giraffe Calf

At just four weeks old, the newest arrival of the Zoological Society of London’s Whipsnade Zoo is already standing tall – at almost six feet (1.83 m)! The Reticulated Giraffe, a baby girl, was born to proud parents Savannah and Uno on November 13.

Learn more at Zooborns.